Month: May 2015

Quiche Lorraine

This quiche Lorraine is ambiguous: thought to be as French as Edith Piaf, its origin and name (related to the german Kuchen) is German.  Regarded an easy dish, this version is anything but. It is based on the recipe found in the book ‘Heston Blumenthal at Home’ which makes it by definition challenging to execute. But do not be discouraged, it will be an instant hit at your dinner parties. Plus it can be prepared a day in advance as this helps the custard filling to set properly. For the best flavour, it should be served warm or at room temperature. Serves 6 or hungry 4. For the pastry 230g all purpose flour 1/2 tsp sea salt 100g cold unsalted butter, cubed 25g egg, lightly beaten (approx. 1/2 large egg) 40g cold tap water For the filling 40g unsalted butter 4 large onions, peeled  and finely sliced 200g bacon lardons 3 large eggs 300g whipping cream 80g grated gruyère cheese 20g grated parmesan cheese sea salt and freshly ground black pepper nutmeg For the pastry put …

Sambal Chicken

This is a somehow strange combination but works very well. It gives  a hint of Indonesia wrapped in a tortilla, balancing something familiar with the intense sambal. You can substitute the chicken with pork or even mix them. For the sambal chicken 6 skinless, boneless chicken breasts halves, cut in 2cm cubes 3 cups (300g) onions, diced 1/2 cup olive oil, plus more if needed 4 Tbsp smoked chilli sambal 1 cup port wine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper To serve flour tortilla wraps fresh salad leaves greek yogurt Heat the olive oil in a large and deep frying pan over medium heat. Add the chicken pieces in a single layer, in batches and cook until they are light brown on each side. As you finish each batch, transfer the chicken pieces to a bowl. Add more olive oil to the pan if needed. Add the onions and cook until soft and translucent, stirring occasionally for about 3 minutes. Return the chicken to the pan, add the sambal and cook stirring for about 2 minutes. Add …

Smoked Chilli Sambal

Sambal is a spicy Southeast Asian chilli based condiment. There are lots of variations, incorporating many different flavourings and spices. You can add sambal to boiled or fried potatoes, omelettes, fish, prawns, chicken or meat, you can also try it on crackers or in sandwiches. Τhere is actually no limit to the way you can use it, just follow your imagination! It is time consuming, but worth the effort. Cooled and stored in airtight jars, this sambal will keep in the refrigerator for several months. You can also freeze it in small batches. For the Smoked Chilli Sambal , based on the recipe of “The Modern Pantry” cookbook, by Anna Hansen, you will need: sunflower oil for deep-frying 250g red peppers, sliced 250g onions, sliced 250g cherry tomatoes 80g fresh ginger, cut into fine strips 80g garlic, sliced 25g dried prawns, ground in a grinder 1 tsp hot smoked paprika 1/2 tsp dried chilli flakes 125g tamarind paste* 40ml fish sauce In a deep saucepan heat some oil to 180°C. Deep-fry the red peppers, onions and …

Vietnamese Shaking Beef (Thit Bo Luc Lac)

The Ferry building is an iconic San Francisco landmark, featuring in movies set at least 300 years apart – from “The Maltese Falcon” in 1941 to “ Star Trek, Into Darkness” in 2259.  It is there where the “Slanted Door” is located – facing the amazing SF Bay  – and not in Little Saigon next to Chinatown of Polanski fame. Silicon Valley talents along more artistic crowds queue to taste the modern Vietnamese cuisine of chef Charles Phan. ‘Shaking beef’ (Thit bo luc lac) is one of his most popular dishes. It is traditional Vietnamese celebratory food adapted for western jaws. The tough beef cuts have been replaced by tender fillet mignons. “Luc lac” means shaking and refers to the tossing of the beef (thit bo) in the wok while cooking. It is simple to cook and very tasty. The recipe that follows is an adapted version from the eponymous “The Slanted Door, modern Vietnamese food” . Serves 4. 700g filet mignon, trimmed of fat and cut into 2cm cubes 5 Tbsp corn oil 1 …